Dark Arts of Nerdery – Blind Craft: Making Dungeon Tiles for DnD

2016 May 13
by mackan

To be honest I have just made one. To see how hard it is. But I wanted to share with you (and brag) how it came out. As always in a “Things I Have Not Seen”-fashion.

So – advice for cheap GMs, crafty blind folk and other hobbyists to follow:

First - I started with a sheet of roughly 12 cm by 60 cm thick cardboard. Unpainted.

First - I started with a sheet of roughly 12 cm by 60 cm thick cardboard. Unpainted.

I had some ideas for this project. First – I wanted it to be CHEAP. Like, preferrably, dirt cheap. As in made of scraps that I would otherwise throw away.

Secondly – I wanted to see if it was as SIMPLE as I had imagined, when checking out the Dungeon Master G, who has this really cool show on YouTube on how to make a LOT of DnD miniature stuff. Could I even pull this off, not seing?

This is important – all methods here are his. I have only learned by listening to YouTube. Any credit for cool looking tiles goes to him.

The cardboard used for this project came from packaging for the boys’ new beds, so it was totally worth trying out this… The paint came at about 40 SEK each for white and black – so… 8 USD in total?

It took 15 minutes for the black paint to dry up enough for me to continue, so the whole piece took like 30 minutes or so to make. Totally feasible for a blind person. If you are into crafting your own stuff.

For those of you who see with your eyes – how does it look? Good enough to play an encounter on?

I used a sponge to paint the cardboard with black acrylic paint as a primer / background.

I used a sponge to paint the cardboard with black acrylic paint as a primer / background.

My Fiancé, who sees a little bit with her eyes, helped me cut out a 1 inch by 1 inch (2,5 cm * 2,5 cm) sponge

My Fiancé, who sees a little bit with her eyes, helped me cut out a 1 inch by 1 inch (2,5 cm * 2,5 cm) sponge

Squirt out a little white paint, and on the larger white paint, put a smaller blob of black paint. Use the sponge to apply in square-ish, stone-ish shapes. The paints will mix into a grey-ish / highlighted / shadowed stone pattern.

Squirt out a little white paint, and on the larger white paint, put a smaller blob of black paint. Use the sponge to apply in square-ish, stone-ish shapes. The paints will mix into a grey-ish / highlighted / shadowed stone pattern.

Stamp the sponge into stone-ish shapes, forming a grid-ish pattern (it can be used as a "battle-grid", roughly, for those who play that way).

Stamp the sponge into stone-ish shapes, forming a grid-ish pattern (it can be used as a "battle-grid", roughly, for those who play that way).

The "finished" corridor. And the messy table around it.

The "finished" corridor. And the messy table around it.

Finished piece with miniatures. Close up.

Finished piece with miniatures. Close up.

The finished piece with figurines. Zoom out.

The finished piece with figurines. Zoom out.

One Response leave one →
  1. 2016 May 13

    Definitely good enough to play an encounter on!

    That “imperfect” mixing of the colors is really neat trick, looks way more interesting than flat grey would look. Kind of reminds me of modern stylized digital/video game art that I’ve liked.

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