Dark Arts of Nerdery – Blind Crafting – a Water Elemental for DnD

2016 June 13
by mackan

My crafting for Dungeons and Dragons have really kicked off. I really like to make stuff. It gives me inner peace.

This water elemental is also sort of my own idea. Or rather, I used a set of technicques that I learned from watching different YouTube videos but remixed them into my own thing. So, here goes.

Water Elemental - Step 1 - I twisted some wet paper towels into "tentacles", reinforced with white glue, and stacked / shaped the tentacles into a spiraling whirl on a piece of cardboard.

Water Elemental - Step 1 - I twisted some wet paper towels into "tentacles", reinforced with white glue, and stacked / shaped the tentacles into a spiraling whirl on a piece of cardboard.

Water Elemental - Step 2: After the whirl had dried, I placed another sheet of wet kitchen towel on top to create a more watery, less snakey, surface for the miniature.

Water Elemental - Step 2: After the whirl had dried, I placed another sheet of wet kitchen towel on top to create a more watery, less snakey, surface for the miniature.

Water Elemental - Step 4: While the arms and fingers were drying, I started on the body by just running my Hot Glue Gun back and forth over a piece of plastic bag.

Water Elemental - Step 4: While the arms and fingers were drying, I started on the body by just running my Hot Glue Gun back and forth over a piece of plastic bag.

Dark Arts of Nerdery – Blind Crafting – more miniatures. Quick and easy.

2016 June 6
by mackan

I just wanted to share with you some very small ideas on how to quickly rustle up some goblinoid figures.

I experimented a lot on different kinds of paper for this, but what actually worked best was ordinary kitchen tissue paper, closely followed by ordinary printer paper.

What you need to make vaguely goblinoid miniatures

- Paper (tissue paper or printing paper)
- White glue
- optionally a bead for head.

How to do it.

My own process was a trial run, with different kinds of paper and card stock and stuff. Hence the kinda messy pictures. But… Without further ado.

First thing you do, cut a piece of paper about "6 heads" tall and wide. If you are going to make a great creature - use the head size, top to bottom, times 6 for length and width. Mine is a small one...

Step 1: First thing you do, cut a piece of paper about "6 heads" tall and wide. If you are going to make a great creature - use the head size, top to bottom, times 6 for length and width. Mine is a small one...

Step 2: From the top, cut a slit in the middle of the paper, one head-length down. From the bottom, a slit 2 to 3 head lengths...

Step 3: roll the paper from the sides. When you get to the middle cuts, twist the paper into arms and legs on the humanoid (goblinoid).

Step 3: roll the paper from the sides. When you get to the middle cuts, twist the paper into arms and legs on the humanoid (goblinoid).

Step 4: When you have the body shape you want on the paper figure, white glue everything in place.

Step 4: When you have the body shape you want on the paper figure, white glue everything in place.

Step 5: Attach the head. Either you simply roll one out of paper. But I can't be bothered so I use a bead instead.

Step 5: Attach the head. Either you simply roll one out of paper. But I can't be bothered so I use a bead instead.

You could of course always make lots of these. Each step above is a matter of seconds, all except between step 4 and 5, which is where I went to sleep to let the glue dry.

I have also not yet mounted these, or painted them, but that is a matter of hot glue and a washer for mounting and a fairly quick paintjob.

I will certainly do this and make a little army of nasties for my players to encounter, along the line.

But the huge difference between these and the skeletons / undeads I have made earlier, is the time to make ‘em. I could literally make a dozen of these in like half an hour.

So that’s all for today. Über-simple miniatures galore!

Dark Arts of Nerdery – Miniature making. For non-visual crafters / DnD-players

2016 May 30
by mackan

A few of my readers know that when I lost my eye-sight, a few years back, I started to look for games to play with my kids, And that is pretty much how I got back into RPGs after having been away for almost 20 years (with just an occasional game here and there).

I have blogged about how I started to play the 5th edition of Dungeons and Dragons, here. How it was to DM it, in a group of visual players, very much into miniatures and counting squares. (IE 4 ed players…). And I recently blogged about having started to make my first dungeon tiles.

Now, my kids are both sighted and they LOVE miniatures. But I don’t really have the dough to buy every monster, hero or other figurine they want. And then I ran into DM Scotty’s and DMG Info YouTube channels. and I got so pumped with creativity!

I want to make it very clear to everybody that I have pretty much taken their designs, as I understand them, and maybe only slightly tweaked the methods for un-sighted DM-crafters. And here are my first miniatures.

Undeads. (Skeletons and Zombies)

Gerry from DMG Info has a great video on how to make skeletons. Here are the method I used from that video (and later built upon, to make zombies).

FIRST – A FAIR WARNING:
I used to solder before. A LOT. I have mended more mic cords than you have probably seen in your whole life. So I have a soldering iron and I have soldered a few things even since I lost eye-sight. But. It is effing hard. And you can really hurt yourself with molten solder. So. Know what you are doing lest you hurt yourself.

With that said – what you need to make a wire skeleton:

What You Need

What you need to make a skeleton

4 pieces of wire. 3*2 cm and one of 3 cm.
Soldering iron.
Solder (duh)
Something to wrap your longer wire piece around. I took a small Allen key.
Tongs and Wirecutter. I have miniature ones.
Paint.
Blue tack / clay or something to keep parts, temporarily, from moving while you solder them.

Step one – form the rib cage.

Take the longer piece (3 cm) of wire and wrap it around something thin so you get a spring. This is going to be the rib cage of your skeleton.

Step two – form the spine and hip bone.

Take one of the pieces of wire and find, roughly, where the middle is. Now, form one half of the wire into a little loop. This is the hip bone of the skeleton.

Skeleton parts

Wire. Formed into skeleton parts

Step three – attach the ribcage to the spine.

Thread the ribcage onto the spine and push it all down into the blue tack, so that it is laying still. The ribcage should be in the middle of the straight spine, IE half way up from the hip bone loop. Solder it in place.

Now – I believe I said earlier that you should know how to do that or jump to the Zombies part already? Yeah. I meant that. But as a small piece of advice, get the iron well heated up and then hold it to the ribcage/spine for a while to heat that up before you try to melt the solder onto it. It is hard and I had to redo this several times, because it would fall apart when I took it out of the Blue tack.

Four – make and attach the legs.

I basically just bended one of the other wire pieces into a “U”-shape and then soldered them to the bottom of the hip bone loop. Again – Blue tack is your friend.

Five – mount the arms.

Arms are attached right on top of the rib cage, but soldered to the spine. Blue tack is your friend.

Six – Attach head.

I simply glued a bead in place and painted it all.

Unpainted skeleton

Unpainted skeleton.

And thus the skeleton itself is complete. I use 1 inch washers as a base to mount my miniatures on, so I did the same here. Two drops of hot glue from my glue gun and it was done.

Using washers, I think, is really good since it makes the miniatures really bottom-heavy and stable. They are harder to knock over on the table when you play and I am thinking about glueing washers to all my bought miniatures’ bases too, for this reason. Eventually I am thinking about making magnetic tiles to play on… More on that later, I guess.

I paint all my miniatures with black acrylic paint as a base. Then I highlight with different shades of grey, to make the shading kind of “pop out”. Now – this process is really hard to describe, since I don’t actually see the results.

But I dillute the paint with water, somewhat, on the paintbrush so that it will get everywhere on the model. And then I apply the first layer. All black.

The skeleton is supposed to be rather light grey. I hope that it is. My fiancé tells me it looks fine, so I trust her. But I paint it with light grey by just dabbing the paint on, very lightly. My hope is that it will NOT cover some parts, and there will be a natural shading to it that way.

Sighted players can judge the picture below.

The skeleton, painted

The skeleton, painted. Base painted black.

Now Zombies

Making zombies came as an afterthought for me. Soldering the skeleton was really, really hard. So my idea was to hot glue the next couple of skeletons together. I mean, you can never have enough skeletons, right?

Anyway – hot glue is great in a lot of crafting. But it is rather messy. It left large gloopy bubbles of paint or the joint would just break. One can think of this as a problem. Or one can think of this as an opportunity.

I mean –  skeletons certainly don’t have gloopy joints. But what if I could use the hot glue gun to add “flesh” to a more zombie like monster?

So – think of my zombies more like “hot glued skeletons”. With extra hot glue on the parts where I wanted to have some rotting flesh.

Zombie or Banshee or something-

So this is my first zombie. Clothes made from toilet paper. I think it is an undead necromancer. My friends tell me it is a Banshee.

During the process, it became clear to me, though, that I could also add clothes to them, in order to cover up some faults. So I basically rolled some small pieces of toilet paper around the legs to form pants legs, or a skirt. Small square pieces became shirts or mantles.

My first zombie became an undead necromancer – s/he has a cloak and a bead as an orb.

My later tries involved tissue paper to make pants and skirts and shirts and it eventually became this rather cute zombie couple. (Once they were finished, though, I fell in love with them, and let them fall in love with each other, so now they are dancing. Facing each other in an undieing embrace. Open ribcage to open ribcage.

Yup. I am quite the romantic.)

I only have black and white paint at home, so all I can do is black and white and different shades of grey. But sometimes I think that can be good, too. At least for more spooky kind of monsters.

Mr and Mrs Zombie. Unpainted. Glued wire skeletons with tissue paper-and-white glue clothes.

Mr and Mrs Zombie. Unpainted. Glued wire skeletons with tissue paper-and-white glue clothes.

Zombie couple dancing. Painted and mounted.

Zombie couple dancing. Painted and mounted. Not all girlfriends get these kinds of gifts, but mine did.

Dark Arts of Nerdery – Blind Craft: Making Dungeon Tiles for DnD

2016 May 13
by mackan

To be honest I have just made one. To see how hard it is. But I wanted to share with you (and brag) how it came out. As always in a “Things I Have Not Seen”-fashion.

So – advice for cheap GMs, crafty blind folk and other hobbyists to follow:

First - I started with a sheet of roughly 12 cm by 60 cm thick cardboard. Unpainted.

First - I started with a sheet of roughly 12 cm by 60 cm thick cardboard. Unpainted.

I had some ideas for this project. First – I wanted it to be CHEAP. Like, preferrably, dirt cheap. As in made of scraps that I would otherwise throw away.

Secondly – I wanted to see if it was as SIMPLE as I had imagined, when checking out the Dungeon Master G, who has this really cool show on YouTube on how to make a LOT of DnD miniature stuff. Could I even pull this off, not seing?

This is important – all methods here are his. I have only learned by listening to YouTube. Any credit for cool looking tiles goes to him.

The cardboard used for this project came from packaging for the boys’ new beds, so it was totally worth trying out this… The paint came at about 40 SEK each for white and black – so… 8 USD in total?

It took 15 minutes for the black paint to dry up enough for me to continue, so the whole piece took like 30 minutes or so to make. Totally feasible for a blind person. If you are into crafting your own stuff.

For those of you who see with your eyes – how does it look? Good enough to play an encounter on?

I used a sponge to paint the cardboard with black acrylic paint as a primer / background.

I used a sponge to paint the cardboard with black acrylic paint as a primer / background.

My Fiancé, who sees a little bit with her eyes, helped me cut out a 1 inch by 1 inch (2,5 cm * 2,5 cm) sponge

My Fiancé, who sees a little bit with her eyes, helped me cut out a 1 inch by 1 inch (2,5 cm * 2,5 cm) sponge

Squirt out a little white paint, and on the larger white paint, put a smaller blob of black paint. Use the sponge to apply in square-ish, stone-ish shapes. The paints will mix into a grey-ish / highlighted / shadowed stone pattern.

Squirt out a little white paint, and on the larger white paint, put a smaller blob of black paint. Use the sponge to apply in square-ish, stone-ish shapes. The paints will mix into a grey-ish / highlighted / shadowed stone pattern.

Stamp the sponge into stone-ish shapes, forming a grid-ish pattern (it can be used as a "battle-grid", roughly, for those who play that way).

Stamp the sponge into stone-ish shapes, forming a grid-ish pattern (it can be used as a "battle-grid", roughly, for those who play that way).

The "finished" corridor. And the messy table around it.

The "finished" corridor. And the messy table around it.

Finished piece with miniatures. Close up.

Finished piece with miniatures. Close up.

The finished piece with figurines. Zoom out.

The finished piece with figurines. Zoom out.

#DagensKyrkohistoriaFörIckeNördar – Risus Paschalis. Påskaskrattet

2016 March 26
by mackan
Mackan kör standup

Mackan kör standup

Under slutet av medeltiden fanns en tradition i Europa som kallades “Risus Paschalis” – Påskaskrattet.

Påskaskrattet gick till så att på Påskdagen skulle prästen locka församlingen till skratt.

Den teologiska tanken bakom var att när Jesus uppväcktes från de döda, var det ett Kosmiskt skämt. Ett hånskratt rakt upp i synen på djävul och död. Och en skrattande Gud skulle tillbes i ett liturgiskt, gemensamt skratt. Det handlade, bokstavligen, om att fira en Glad Påsk. Inte enbart, vilket en del religionshistoriker hävdar, ett firande av (den hårda och svåra) fastan var slut. Utan en akt av tillbedjan.

Traditionen dog ut efter Reformationen.

Eller gjorde den det? Kanske ska vi återuppliva den? Fira en, i sanning, Glad Påsk? Det finns både en genomtänkt teologi och en historiskt förankrad tradition här, i alla fall.

Hur som helst – be aldrig om ursäkt eller skäms för din humor. Aldrig. Den är ett karaktärsdrag som du ärvt av Skärmtets Herre och som gör dig till Hans avbild.

Glad Påsk! (Och skicka den här bloggposten till din församlingspastor så hen hinner förbereda sig inför i morgon.)

Några tankar kring termen “Guds Ord”

2016 March 18
by mackan

Nya Testamentet. I punktskrift.

Jag, liksom många teologer med mig, skruvar lite obekvämt på mig när människor i min närhet refererar till de bibliska skrifterna som “Guds Ord” eller ännu mer “Ordet”.

Först och främst är det något som närmar sig villolära för mig, då jag inte anser att det är Bibeln som är Guds Ord, utan att det är Jesus som är det.

Och innan jag nu får arga brev från kollegor där ute; Jag står fast vid Frälsningsarméns första lärosats “(Vi tror) att Gamla och Nya Testamentets skrifter är givna av Gud genom inspiration och att de allena utgör det gudomliga rättesnöret för kristen tro och kristet liv”.

Jag tror alltså att varje lära som vi bygger måste vara grundad i texten. Men jag följer Jesus, inte Bibeln. Att vara kristen är inte i första hand att läsa Bibeln, att förstå Bibeln eller ens att följa Bibelns bud. Att vara kristen är att följa Jesus. Det är Jesus som är Ordet. (Läs gärna inledningen av Johannesevanegeliet för en presentation av den tanken).

Så – det är ett av skälen till att jag värjer mig för termen. När vi pratar om Bibeln måste vi inse vad det är för en bok (-samling) och framför allt måste vi inse att det är en bok, inte en person. Och att kristendomen är en relation med Jesus, inte ett system eller en instruktionsbok att följa.

Jag vet att en del människor som kallar sig “bibeltrogna” nu börjar skruva på sig, men det finns inga rimliga förhållningssätt till kristendomen som håller för hårt i Bibeln. Eller som sätter likhetstecken mellan att hålla hårt i Bibeln och vara “riktig kristen”.

För så här är det ju: De allra flesta kristna genom historien har inte haft tillgång till någon Bibel.

Nästan varje person du läst om i kyrkohistorien före reformationen hade inte ens en hel Bibel. (Franciskus, exempelvis, hade typ Markusevangeliet och något av breven, när han startade sin första kommunitet.) Före 1500-talet var Bibeln något man reste (långt) för att få höra. Och sedan memorera. De kunde inte hålla sig vare sig för bokstavliga till texten. Och, om vi ska vara ärliga så har under det senaste seklet kristendomen vuxit väldigt snabbt i områden där analfabetism fortfarande är väldigt utbredd och / eller där det inte finns biblar tillgängligt av andra skäl.

Så den som vill hålla sig väldigt biblicistiskt till kristendomen och / eller hävda att man måste läsa Bibeln för att vara en God Kristen måste i så fall diskvalificera i princip alla sina kristna Syskon genom hela historien och i stället hävda att den enda kristna tradition som gäller är den hyperprivilegierade som denne själv står i. Där vi har tillgång till en bibel, på vårt eget språk och vi själva fått lära oss att läsa.

Men jag har ytterligare ett, tredje, skäl till att jag skruvar lite på mig. Och det är den ganska utbredda vanan att hävda “som Ordet säger” om väldigt korta Bibelsammanhang. Eller ännu värre, att citera ett kort stycke som man tycker stämmer in på en åsikt man själv har och sedan, när man får mothugg, hävda att motståndaren talar mot Guds Ord, eller liknande. Det är ett retoriskt skamgrepp.

För; “Gamla och Nya Testamentets skrifter är givna av Gud genom inspiration“. Inte diktamen.

Gud utvalde olika människor att förmedla Hans budskap. En del var poeter, andra var fiskare eller herdar och det märks i deras språkbruk. Någon var präst, någon annan var läkare, någon tredje var diplomat. Och så vidare. Poängen är att texten fick sin utformning inte utan mänsklig påverkan eller inblandning.  Och det i sin tur innebär att vi inte kan hävda att en enskild mening eller så är “Guds Ord”.

Vi kan hävda att hela Bibeln är “Guds inspirerade ord”. Och vi kan kanske rent av hävda (med stöd i 2 Timoteusbrevet 3:16-17) att “Varje bok bland skrifterna…” är det. Men det handlar fortfarande om hela skrifter. Inte enskilda meningar, utan kontext.

Bibeln gavs inte vers för vers. Bibelns versindelning kommer på 1500-talet, först, och det är egentligen ett svek mot texten att läsa den vers för vers, utan sammanhang. Att hävda att en enskild vers, mitt i, utan att ge ett sammanhang – och sedan hävda att din åsikt är “bekräftad av Guds ord” är närmast parodiskt felaktigt. Det är att skapa villolära.  Det är att handskas ovarsamt med Skriften och det snarare döljer Guds ord än något annat.

Teologeek: Vad är Teologi egentligen?

2016 March 14
by mackan
Braille Greek New Testament

Bild på Nya Testamentet på Grekiska - typiskt sådant som teologer sysslar med.

“Teologi” är ett rätt vanskligt ord att förhålla sig till. Vad betyder det ens? Om någon säger sig ägna sig åt “Teologi” – vad gör denne då?

Teologi är egentligen ett sammansatt ord och här brukar en del anlägga en förnumstig min och hävda att “Teologi” ska utläsas som “Läran om Gud”. “Theos” och “Logia”, såsom läran.

Själv menar jag i stället att vi ska läsa ordet “logia” bokstavligt (!) och översätta som “orden om Gud”, eller kanske modernare – samtalen om Gud.

Det finns flera skäl till att jag längtar efter en sådan läsning och förståelse. Dels blir det lättare att faktiskt förstå vad någon som påstår sig ägna sig åt “teologi” ens sysslar med. Och tydlighet är ju sällan dåligt. Och dels ger det en vink om vem som är inbjuden till det där “samtalet”, nämligen alla, medan “lära” avgränsar samtalet till att enbart gälla de lärde.

Men den förståelsen av ordet “teologi” för oss också närmare en mer historiskt förankrad kristendom. Om vi tänker på kristendom och teologi som något som “lärs ut” av specifika “lärare” till enskilda “elever”, missar vi verkligen målet. I en klassisk kristendom talar man om “didaché” – träning (inte lära), om “ortodoxi” – “rätt tillbedjan” (inte lära), och så vidare. Själva ordet “teori” lyser i princip med sin frånvaro genom hela kyrkohistorien, fram till modern tid.

Det vi sysslar med är alltså inte primärt filosofi eller psykologi. Det är inte tankar. Det är förståelsen av praktiker, av tillbedjan och av träning som Teologin består. Och den förståelsen uppkommer genom samtal.

Hur skulle en utbildning i “Teologi” kunna se ut?

Ja, till att börja med skulle den vara praktisk. Det är inte mindre teologiskt att så att säga bre mackor på ett härbärge för uteliggare än att diskutera religionsfilosofi.

För det andra skulle mycket mer reflektion ske i grupp. Samtalet om Gud förutsätter flera parter. Det är inte den enskildes strävan efter Den Perfekta Läran om Gud vi sysslar med. Det är ett samtal och ett “tillsammans” måste skapas!

Först när det vi sysslar med som teologer börjar likna de här väldigt ortodoxa, praktiska och klassiska definitionerna har vi antagligen något att säga in i Kristenhetens liv. Och kanske kan också teologin (eller studier / träning i teologi) också leda till att någon faktiskt hittar Gud.

Vore inte det maxat?

Dark Arts of Nerdery – DnD 5 House Rules: Blindness

2016 February 24
by mackan

Ulgarth the Cane Bearer. Don't trip on those sharp objects, Ulgarth!

After having read Elsa Henry’s wonderful Dungeons, Dragons and Disabilities (go read if you haven’t already! No, I mean it – do it! It is great!) I got inspired to try to translate my real life experience of being and becoming blind as an adult into the DnD game.

This is mostly a starting point for a deeper discussion, but it is also a real suggestion on how to add one more… feature – because it is not only a disability – to the game.

So anyway – here are some house rules for a blind character

First of all – how should one correctly calculate DEX? Dexterity is both ones ability to move around, which typically blind people might have difficulty with. On the other hand, most blind people are very tactile, dexterious (as in nimble-fingered), etc. DEX is standardly used in defining ability to move, though, so I would suggest a 3D6 – a D4 (instead of an ordinary d20) to determine dexterity. (A DEX with maximum of 17 is feeling more realistic to me than a max of 19 with a D20 – 1, for a blind character.)

The D4 Points you detract from DEX can be added (and split between) WIS and INT instead. I am not sure that lack of eye-sight makes you smarter, per se, but intelligently adapting to your surroundings is certainly a skill that is developed in real life.

Classes

When choosing a class for a blind adventurer, I would automatically think about the different spellcaster classes. Simply because they can strike from out of range of the monster.

However, if you play a role who becomes blind during the game, I would use some sort of multi-classing. But I would not recommend that to beginner players. It makes total sense, though, reality-wise. You can be a Rouge, but loss of eye-sight force you into becoming a Bard. However – your Rouge experience is still very much in place, although you have changed careers and are now learning a new trade.

Ability scores

Being blind is not a only a DIS-ability, but also an ability. Sure, you have lower DEX, but higher WIS and in My House Rules, you have an Advantage (roll two D20, choose the best result) on any checks for Perception or Insight.

You have a disadvantage (roll two D20, choose the worst result) on any attacks. As explained by the Players’ Handbook

When you attack a target that you can’t see, you have
disadvantage on the attack roll. This is true whether
you’re guessing the target’s location or you’re targeting
a creature you can hear but not see.

Tough luck, blind adventurer. But you are gifted in other areas.

In closing

I think that any player, really, should be encouraged to try this. Maybe multi-classing is the most realistic way of describing loss of eye-sight as a grown up. But I would certainly use these rules on level 1 characters too.

In closing, I am a bit disappointed in the combat system in DnD, that only deals with general Hit Points. I would love to read some alternative on how to calculate damage in order to see if any adventurer or creature actually loses eye-sight, permanently, in the game. (Or, actually, is permanently disabled / differently abled in some other way.) But the combat is Clean this way. And the system opens for several other parts of the adventuring to be as important, so there’s that.

If there are blind players out there, I would love to hear from you about how realistic these house rules are, when describing our condition(s).

And as Always – it is, in the end, Always about having fun!

Comics – Art in relationship; A story of Joy and Being terrified at the same time

2016 February 1
by mackan

So. I did it.

My God. I did it. I actually, really, did it.

I signed up for an Art School class. On how to draw comics. Name of the class “Comics – Art in relationship”.

My inner 15-year old is very, very happy. He wanted to go to a special Comic Creation High School. (I have no idea how to translate “Serietecknargymnasiet” to English). But ended up studying Economics instead. Because you could, or so the story was told, get a job if you did.

My inner 40 year old is terrified, almost panicking.

But I still have inner Pictures, things that I want to share with you. And I am setting out to create a visual and tactile comic.

The only reason I share this with you, is so that I don’t back out or give up.

Sure – I am blind. Sure – I have not drawn a line in years. Sure – this might not work. I might not have the time to get the assignments in. I might not understand Everything visual going on in class. And I certainly can’t see or experience the art of my class mates.

But I am doing this. For real. I will do this. Finish this.

I will create my own comic. I am making art again.

The Star Wars Saga as robotic romcom

2016 January 30
by mackan

Just how many ways can I tell of my love?
16 million ways of communication,
is still not enough – it’s larger than life
and stronger than the Death Star space station.

You’re the light of the suns, you’re the shine of the stars
you’re the keeper of secrets and truth.
You’re the keeper, also, of my cirquitry heart,
you repair, make me whole and you soothe.

I will listen to you, how you beautifully bleep,
I understand every word that you say.
For this story began, a long time ago
in a galaxy far, far away.

I was talking, some time back, with my significant other about the Star Wars movies. You see – she had not seen them, but know that I am a huge fan. (yep, I know the names of most of the spaceships, what kind of race Boba Fett is and I can recite the Original Trilogy, word for word, by heart.) And now we watched the OT together, so that we could go to Ep VII – “The Force Awakens” together.

And she told me she liked the robots. That they are cute. And how, in part, they remind her of us two. How she is R2-D2 and how I am C-3PO. And it made me open my eyes and see it. It had been there all along, but I had not recognized it before. Star Wars is the multi film series about the love story between two robots, throughout some 60 years!

Just think about it!

They meet in Episode I, and R2 seem to fall in love directly with the protocol droid, even though his “parts is showing”. (Funny scene, written totally so that Lucas could make the pun). And they later come to stick together. In fact, they are the only two that constantly keep helping each other and look out for each other, though out the whole series.

They fight at times, but they always return to one another. And they stay together. They are the droids they are looking for, in each other.

Seen in this way, the series become really kinda cute. And quite Beautiful. See 3PO’s reaction in Ep IV when he spots R2 at the jawas in this new light. Your heart will melt at the “R2! It IS you! It IS you!” line. Or the “You must repair him. Sir, if any of my circuits or gears will help, I’ll gladly donate them.” Or in ep V when he tries to comfort R2 as he stands guard at the northern entrance, waiting for Luke. Or…

Actually, there are dozens of pretty mundane lines or scenes that get really Beautiful when you think of them as being said or acted out in love. The droids are self sacrifying, vulnerable and honest and really, really comitted to each other. It makes the Star Wars films Beautiful, and I love to watch them with this in mind.

The story is not about Star Wars at all, but about Droid Love!